Category: Ecology »

India’s economic burden on its environment is heavier than anticipated

The environmental policies of any country intend to bring its environmental concerns to the forefront in pursuit of sustainable development. India has emerged as the sixth largest economy in 2018. It is also the second most populous country in the world with over 1.35 billion people (World Population Review, 2018). The country has been doing fairly well in terms of the creation of economic opportunities and large-scale urbanization. With the changing times, the country’s demand for expansion of urban environment is increasing, resulting in a boost in its real estate and the industrial sector. This article critically analyses the environmental policies vis-a-vis of Mauritius, Singapore, Japan, the Netherlands, and the UK. Read more »

India’s commitment towards environmental protection and climate change

There is a rising consensus for environmental protection across the world. Climate change is a concerning issue all over the world due to its manifold detrimental aftereffects. The term is interchangeable with the phrase “global warming”. Both terms refer to the rise in the mean global temperature resulting from increasing concentration of greenhouse gases (GHG) in the Earth’s atmosphere (EESI, 2018).  Read more »

Establishing a relationship between FDI and air pollution in India

The previous articles in this study established how Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) affects the economic growth of a country. In India, in the last two decades, the inflow of FDI has grown significantly. Similarly, its environmental pollution has also been rising since 1991 due to an increase in economic activity. This article empirically investigates the impact of FDI on air pollution in India. In order to do so, it establishes a long run association between FDI inflows and air pollution in the post reform period, i.e. since 1991. The previous article identified the common air pollution indicators, of which Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions is the most significant. The figure below shows that total GHG emissions have increased drastically in India. Read more »

Common water pollution indicators and their use in economic studies

The previous article reviewed the indicators of air pollution and their use in economic studies. This article focuses on a number of water pollution indicators and their use in economic studies. This is because indicators of water pollution help analyse the impact of economic growth on the environment. Water pollution refers to the contamination of water by toxic elements and harmful chemical agents. It implies an alteration in the natural state of water including its physical, chemical and biological properties. Water pollution due to chemicals from industrial toxic releases. Read more »

Common air pollution indicators and their use in economic studies

The previous article discussed the role of six different types of pollution in the degradation of the environment. These were air, water, soil, thermal, noise and radiation pollution. The article also identified some of the key factors that contribute to the degradation and counteractive measures that developing countries can adopt. Air pollution is one of those six types of pollution that contaminates the environment. It is a major contributor. Researchers in the field of economics use these common air pollution indicators to assess the impact of air pollution on macro and microeconomic issues such as policy making, economic growth, and prediction of welfare costs. Read more »

Environmental pollution timeline of India

The economic growth of a region results in an improved standard of living.  It leads to industrial and infrastructure development which in turn create job opportunities. However, these improvements come at the cost of a decline in the sustainability of the region when the adverse effects of economic expansion go unchecked for a long period. Read more »

Contributors to the degrading environment

The term ‘environment’ derives from the French word “environ,” which means “surrounding.” Environment includes both natural and atmosphere such as air, water, vegetation and extends up to the social system formulated. Read more »

Harvesting useful byproducts from bioremediation

With the ever-increasing population of the world, the utilization and therefore the demand for energy resources is also increasing. Also, the quick diminishing rate of the natural resources due to their degradation has created an urgent need to find alternative resources (Sasikumar & Papinazath, 2003). In the long run, bioremediation can help fulfill the increasing demands for energy resources, pollution control  and waste management. Read more »

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